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Topic: Pelvic floor disorders

  1. Brochure, Fact Sheet: Changes in Pelvic Floor Function at Childbirth and After Delivery

    309

    By: Anne M Weber, MD, MS

    There is no doubt that the structures of the pelvis go through dramatic changes during pregnancy and at the time of vaginal childbirth. For vaginal childbirth to occur, the baby must be able to fit past the pelvic muscles and connective tissue. There is usually some amount of stretching or tearing that allows this to happen. 

    Can the management of pregnancy or delivery be modified to minimize the chance of injury? If injury occurs, what can be done to maximize the chance of recovery so that symptoms do not develop? What treatments are available?

    Also available offline as a glossy color brochure (3.5" x 8.5"). Contact IFFGD for details

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  2. Brochure, Fact Sheet: Bowel Incontinence and Aging

    313

    By: William F. Norton, Communications Director, IFFGD; Jeanette Tries, PhD, OTR

    Easy Read Format. Many things happen as we age that makes a loss of bowel control more likely. Illness, injury, changes in bowel habits and other factors affect the ability to stay in control. Loss of bowel control is surprisingly common. It happens to a lot of people. There are a number of ways to be helped. This pamphlet will help you understand what is wrong and what you can do about it.

    Also available offline as a glossy color brochure (3.5" x 8.5"). Contact IFFGD for details.

    This publication is also available in Spanish. Go»

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  3. Brochure, Fact Sheet: Changes in Bowel Control at Childbirth

    314

    By: William F. Norton, Communications Director, IFFGD; Jeanette Tries, PhD, OTR

    Easy Read Format. Many women develop bowel control problems during or after pregnancy. Changes can occur in muscles and nerves that control the ability to hold in gas, urine, or stool. These problems may begin right away or years after delivery. This article reviews causes, ways to improve bowel control, and tips on finding help. Also available offline as a glossy color brochure (3.5" x 8.5"). Contact IFFGD for details.

    This publication is also available in Spanish. Go»

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  4. Fact Sheet: Disorders Related to Excessive Pelvic Floor Muscle Tension

    109

    By: Jeanette Tries, PhD, OTR

    Disorders which have excessive pelvic floor muscle activity as their primary feature are often not recognized and diagnosed by physicians. However, millions of people suffer from such disorders and associated symptoms of disabling pain and disruptions in bowel and bladder control. Unfortunately, individuals with these disorders frequently seek help for many years before receiving any explanation for, or relief from their disturbing symptoms. The purpose of this article is to briefly explain the role of the pelvic floor muscles and some symptoms related to the presence of elevated tension in these muscles, and to describe various treatment options available.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  5. Fact Sheet: Biofeedback & Bowel Disorders: Teaching Yourself to Live without the Problem

    112

    By: Mary K. Plummer, OTR, BCIA-PMBD; Jeanette Tries, PhD, OTR

    Biofeedback is a neuromuscular reeducation tool we can use to tell if certain processes in our bodies are working correctly. It is a painless process that uses a computer and a video monitor to display bodily functions that we usually are not aware of. Special sensors measure these functions, which are displayed as sounds we can hear, or as linegraphs we can see on a computer screen. A therapist helps us use this displayed information to modify or change abnormal responses to more normal patterns such as increasing a response, decreasing a response, or learning to coordinate two responses more effectively.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  6. Fact Sheet: Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders of the Small Intestine, Large Intestine, Rectum, and Pelvic Floor

    162

    By: William E. Whitehead, PhD

    The gastrointestinal tract is divided into four distinct parts that are separated by sphincter muscles; these four regions have distinctly different functions to perform and different patterns of motility (contractions). Abnormal motility or abnormal sensitivity in any part of the gastrointestinal tract can cause characteristic symptoms: food sticking, pain, or heartburn in the esophagus; nausea and vomiting in the stomach; pain and bloating in the small intestine; and pain, constipation, diarrhea, and incontinence in the colon and rectum.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  7. Fact Sheet: Rectocele: Symptoms Include Vaginal Pain or Constipation

    165

    By: Bruce A. Orkin, MD

    A rectocele is a bulge from the rectum into the vagina. Most rectoceles occur in women where the front wall of the rectum is up against the back wall of the vagina. This area is called the rectovaginal septum and may be a weak area in the female anatomy. Other structures may also push into the vagina. A description of causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  8. Fact Sheet: Understanding the Quality of Life Impact of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    205

    By: Brennan M. R. Spiegel, MD

    Functional gastrointestinal (G) disorders significantly impact health related quality of life. This impact is obvious to anyone who has a disorder, or to any provider who cares for people with these disorders. In light of this finding, several medical organizations suggest that healthcare providers carefully monitor the health related quality of life of their patients in order to help guide treatment decisions. However, some studies indicate that many (but by no means all) providers do a poor job of addressing their patients' concerns, and accurately assessing the impact of functional GI disorder symptoms on their overall health status. Patients, in turn, become dissatisfied with their care. This article aims to help both provider and patient understand health related quality of life and improve patient care.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  9. Fact Sheet: How to Prepare for Tests

    219

    By: W. Grant Thompson, MD, FRCPC

    In many cases, doctors can make a diagnosis of a functional gastrointestinal disorder after a careful history and examination. Often, however, there is a structural disease that must be excluded by tests that probe the gastrointestinal tract. This fact sheet reviews preparation for common tests, including sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  10. Fact Sheet: Dyssynergic Defecation: Questions and Answers About a Common Cause of Chronic Constipation

    237

    By: Satish S.C. Rao, MD, PhD, FRCP (LON)

    Constipation affects nearly everyone at some point in their lives. Constipation that occurs now and then may result from many factors such as dietary changes, some medicines, or inactivity or travel and will generally respond to simple lifestyle measures. But constipation that is long-lasting or keeps coming back (chronic) may require more effort to diagnose and treat. When that happens, a trip to the doctor is in order to find out the cause and develop a treatment plan.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
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