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Topic: Anal, Rectal Disorders

  1. Brochure, Fact Sheet: Changes in Pelvic Floor Function at Childbirth and After Delivery

    309

    By: Anne M Weber, MD, MS

    There is no doubt that the structures of the pelvis go through dramatic changes during pregnancy and at the time of vaginal childbirth. For vaginal childbirth to occur, the baby must be able to fit past the pelvic muscles and connective tissue. There is usually some amount of stretching or tearing that allows this to happen. 

    Can the management of pregnancy or delivery be modified to minimize the chance of injury? If injury occurs, what can be done to maximize the chance of recovery so that symptoms do not develop? What treatments are available?

    Also available offline as a glossy color brochure (3.5" x 8.5"). Contact IFFGD for details

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  2. Fact Sheet: What you can do after. (Anal discomfort and how to deal with it)

    137

    By: W. Grant Thompson, MD, FRCPC

    Symptoms related to this sensitive area can be very troubling, yet many people are reluctant to discuss them. Itching (pruritis ani), painful defecation, stained underwear, spotting of blood, and offensive odor add up to embarrassment, distress, social handicap and anguish. These complaints of anal discomfort are very common. Symptoms may coexist with the irritable bowel syndrome or other functional bowel disease. Diarrhea and constipation may aggravate them. Anal symptoms are not part of these conditions as they may occur independently. They may be due to or associated with many local diseases. Whatever the association, perianal irritation can be treated. Find out how to get help and what to do about it. Reviewed and updated 2009.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  3. Fact Sheet: Proctalgia Fugax-and Other Pains

    160

    By: W. Grant Thompson, MD, FRCPC

    Many diseases of the anus and rectum may cause severe rectal pain. Usually a doctor can identify such a condition by examining the area. One pain that cannot be so identified is proctalgia fugax, a sudden severe pain that lasts for several minutes and then disappears. An overview of the condition. Reviewed 2009.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  4. Fact Sheet: Rectocele: Symptoms Include Vaginal Pain or Constipation

    165

    By: Bruce A. Orkin, MD

    A rectocele is a bulge from the rectum into the vagina. Most rectoceles occur in women where the front wall of the rectum is up against the back wall of the vagina. This area is called the rectovaginal septum and may be a weak area in the female anatomy. Other structures may also push into the vagina. A description of causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  5. Fact Sheet: Why Symptom Criteria for Functional Gut Disorders?

    182

    By: W. Grant Thompson, MD, FRCPC

    The "functional" gut disorders are syndromes (groups of symptoms) believed to arise from the gastrointestinal tract, but which lack a known cause. The purpose is to update the criteria upon which the diagnoses of functional gut disorders rest.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  6. Fact Sheet: Report from IFFGD Research Award Winner: Mechanisms of Fecal Incontinence

    312

    By: Adil E. Bharucha, MD

    In this article, I will try to provide a flavor for our research activities and highlight what we understand about the mechanisms of fecal incontinence and constipation. Fecal incontinence is a relatively common symptom. In listening to patients, I realized that fecal incontinence could have a devastating impact on lifestyle, that our understanding of factors responsible for incontinence was limited, and that available therapies were of variable efficacy. Therefore, our studies are directed toward answering several important questions pertaining to "idiopathic" fecal incontinence, that is fecal incontinence not resulting from another underlying disease such as multiple sclerosis.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
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