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Topic: Gas, Bloating, Belching

  1. Brochure: Talking To Your Doctor About Incontinence

    321

    By: William F. Norton, Communications Director, IFFGD

    Easy Read Format. If you see changes in your bowel control, the first step is to tell your doctor. Most people feel uneasy talking about their stool, intestinal gas, or bowel movements. But doctors understand that these are very normal and necessary processes in all of us. Doctors and other therapists are there to help when bodily processes go wrong. So the first very important step is to talk plainly about the problems you are experiencing.

    Also available offline as a glossy color brochure (3.5" x 8.5"). Contact IFFGD for details.

    This publication is also available in Spanish. Go»

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  2. Brochure: Como Hablar Con Tu Medico Acerca de la Incontinencia

    321S

    By: William F. Norton, Communications Director, IFFGD

    Easy Read Format. Si sientes que tienes cambios en el control de tus esfínteres, lo primero que debes hacer es avisarle a tu medico. La mayoría de las personas se sienten incómodas para hablar de sus heces fecales, gas intestinal, o de sus evacuaciones. Sin embargo los médicos entienden que estos son procesos muy normales y necesarios en todos nosotros. Los doctores y otros terapeutas están para ayudarte cuando tus procesos corporales fallan. Por lo tanto, el primer paso importante que debes tomar, es hablar claramente acerca de los problemas que te aquejan.

    Also available offline as a glossy color brochure (3.5" x 8.5"). Contact IFFGD for details.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  3. Fact Sheet: Relationship of Diet to Functional GI Disorders

    139

    By: Raquel Croitoru, MD, FACG

    The symptoms of functional GI disorders, such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and constipation can by initiated or exacerbated by stress, hormones, drugs, and diet. Certain foods can induce symptoms that mimic certain functional GI disorders. Review of an individual's diet is important when dealing with functional GI symptoms.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  4. Fact Sheet: Diet and Functional Bowel Disease

    143

    By: Kenneth W. Heaton, MD, FRCP

    The exact nature of the connection between what people eat and how their intestines behave is controversial, but there is certainly a connection. The effects of foods on the gut are reviewed.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  5. Fact Sheet: Fiber Therapy in IBS and other GI Disorders

    152

    By: James W. Anderson, MD

    Specific food practices may contribute to constipation, diarrhea, bloating, gas, and abdominal pain. Based on our observation and experiences in nutrition research, we will share with you some suggestions for improving bowel function and decreasing symptom severity.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  6. Fact Sheet: Controlling Intestinal Gas

    155

    By: William F. Norton, Communications Director, IFFGD

    Everybody produces gas, and everybody needs to pass gas. The amount depends on the individual, and there is a wide range of "normal." Passing gas is normal; nevertheless, it can be embarrassing or cause discomfort. A review of causes, treatments, and tips on controlling gas.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  7. Fact Sheet: The Lower GI Tract and its Common Functional Disorders:

    158

    By: David S. Greenbaum

    IBS, Chronic Functional Abdominal Pain, Bloating and Gas, Constipation, Diarrhea

    The term "functional" as used in medicine, generally is taken to mean symptoms not accompanied by demonstrable abnormalities on physical examination, blood tests, x-rays, biopsies, endoscopies or other procedures. An overview of common disorders that affect the colon.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  8. Fact Sheet: Difficult to Interpret Intestinal Complaints

    179

    By: W. Grant Thompson, MD, FRCPC

    Disorders of gastrointestinal function such as the irritable bowel syndrome or functional constipation, diarrhea, or bloating are characterized by no structural abnormality. In these cases, diagnosis depends entirely upon the history, and diagnostic tests, if needed at all, are done to rule out inflammations, tumors and other anatomic gut disease. Accurate diagnosis depends upon how accurately the individual describes his or her symptoms, and how skillfully the doctor interprets them. Reviewed and updated 2009.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  9. Fact Sheet: Understanding the Quality of Life Impact of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    205

    By: Brennan M. R. Spiegel, MD

    Functional gastrointestinal (G) disorders significantly impact health related quality of life. This impact is obvious to anyone who has a disorder, or to any provider who cares for people with these disorders. In light of this finding, several medical organizations suggest that healthcare providers carefully monitor the health related quality of life of their patients in order to help guide treatment decisions. However, some studies indicate that many (but by no means all) providers do a poor job of addressing their patients' concerns, and accurately assessing the impact of functional GI disorder symptoms on their overall health status. Patients, in turn, become dissatisfied with their care. This article aims to help both provider and patient understand health related quality of life and improve patient care.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  10. Fact Sheet: Report from IFFGD Research Award Winner: Understanding Intestinal Gas

    214

    By: Fernando Azpiroz, MD, PhD

    Everybody has gas in his or her digestive tract (the esophagus, stomach, small intestine/bowel, and large intestine/bowel). What is happening that causes painful or uncomfortable symptoms associated with gas in some persons while not in others? Report from this 2005 IFFGD Research Award Winner.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
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