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Topic: Diarrhea, loose stools

  1. Brochure, Fact Sheet: Bowel Incontinence and Aging

    313

    By: William F. Norton, Communications Director, IFFGD; Jeanette Tries, PhD, OTR

    Easy Read Format. Many things happen as we age that makes a loss of bowel control more likely. Illness, injury, changes in bowel habits and other factors affect the ability to stay in control. Loss of bowel control is surprisingly common. It happens to a lot of people. There are a number of ways to be helped. This pamphlet will help you understand what is wrong and what you can do about it.

    Also available offline as a glossy color brochure (3.5" x 8.5"). Contact IFFGD for details.

    This publication is also available in Spanish. Go»

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  2. Fact Sheet: Functional Diarrhea - Some Answers to Often Asked Questions

    105

    By: Ira Merkel, MD

    Overview of functional diarrhea, including answers to the following questions: What is diarrhea? What are functional bowel disorders? Is functional diarrhea the same as irritable bowel syndrome? What is the cause of functional diarrhea? What treatments are available for functional diarrhea? Revised and updated 2009.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  3. Fact Sheet: Biofeedback & Bowel Disorders: Teaching Yourself to Live without the Problem

    112

    By: Mary K. Plummer, OTR, BCIA-PMBD; Jeanette Tries, PhD, OTR

    Biofeedback is a neuromuscular reeducation tool we can use to tell if certain processes in our bodies are working correctly. It is a painless process that uses a computer and a video monitor to display bodily functions that we usually are not aware of. Special sensors measure these functions, which are displayed as sounds we can hear, or as linegraphs we can see on a computer screen. A therapist helps us use this displayed information to modify or change abnormal responses to more normal patterns such as increasing a response, decreasing a response, or learning to coordinate two responses more effectively.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  4. Fact Sheet: Visceral Sensations and Brain-Gut Mechanisms

    127

    By: Emeran A. Mayer, MD

    Over the past several years, different mechanisms located within the gut, or gut wall have been implicated as possible pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the characteristic IBS symptoms of abdominal pain and discomfort. The list ranges from altered transit of intestinal gas, alterations in the colonic flora, immune cell activation in the gut mucosa, and alterations in serotonin containing enterochromaffin cells lining the gut. For those investigators with a good memory, these novel mechanisms can be added to an older list of proposed pathomechanisms, including altered gut motility ("spastic colitis") and alterations in mucus secretion.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  5. Fact Sheet: What you can do after. (Anal discomfort and how to deal with it)

    137

    By: W. Grant Thompson, MD, FRCPC

    Symptoms related to this sensitive area can be very troubling, yet many people are reluctant to discuss them. Itching (pruritis ani), painful defecation, stained underwear, spotting of blood, and offensive odor add up to embarrassment, distress, social handicap and anguish. These complaints of anal discomfort are very common. Symptoms may coexist with the irritable bowel syndrome or other functional bowel disease. Diarrhea and constipation may aggravate them. Anal symptoms are not part of these conditions as they may occur independently. They may be due to or associated with many local diseases. Whatever the association, perianal irritation can be treated. Find out how to get help and what to do about it. Reviewed and updated 2009.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  6. Fact Sheet: Relationship of Diet to Functional GI Disorders

    139

    By: Raquel Croitoru, MD, FACG

    The symptoms of functional GI disorders, such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and constipation can by initiated or exacerbated by stress, hormones, drugs, and diet. Certain foods can induce symptoms that mimic certain functional GI disorders. Review of an individual's diet is important when dealing with functional GI symptoms.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  7. Fact Sheet: Diet and Functional Bowel Disease

    143

    By: Kenneth W. Heaton, MD, FRCP

    The exact nature of the connection between what people eat and how their intestines behave is controversial, but there is certainly a connection. The effects of foods on the gut are reviewed.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  8. Fact Sheet: Chronic Diarrhea: Could it Have an Everyday Cause?

    150

    By: W. Grant Thompson, MD, FRCPC

    Chronic diarrhea has many causes. Malabsorption, Crohn's disease, colitis, and pancreatic insufficiency are topics for another day. This article focuses upon those causes where a change in behavior may result in a rapid improvement in the diarrhea. Reviewed and updated 2009.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  9. Fact Sheet: Fiber Therapy in IBS and other GI Disorders

    152

    By: James W. Anderson, MD

    Specific food practices may contribute to constipation, diarrhea, bloating, gas, and abdominal pain. Based on our observation and experiences in nutrition research, we will share with you some suggestions for improving bowel function and decreasing symptom severity.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  10. Fact Sheet: The Lower GI Tract and its Common Functional Disorders:

    158

    By: David S. Greenbaum

    IBS, Chronic Functional Abdominal Pain, Bloating and Gas, Constipation, Diarrhea

    The term "functional" as used in medicine, generally is taken to mean symptoms not accompanied by demonstrable abnormalities on physical examination, blood tests, x-rays, biopsies, endoscopies or other procedures. An overview of common disorders that affect the colon.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
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