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Topic: Lower Abdominal Pain, Pelvic Pain

  1. Fact Sheet: Disorders Related to Excessive Pelvic Floor Muscle Tension

    109

    By: Jeanette Tries, PhD, OTR

    Disorders which have excessive pelvic floor muscle activity as their primary feature are often not recognized and diagnosed by physicians. However, millions of people suffer from such disorders and associated symptoms of disabling pain and disruptions in bowel and bladder control. Unfortunately, individuals with these disorders frequently seek help for many years before receiving any explanation for, or relief from their disturbing symptoms. The purpose of this article is to briefly explain the role of the pelvic floor muscles and some symptoms related to the presence of elevated tension in these muscles, and to describe various treatment options available.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  2. Fact Sheet: Biofeedback & Bowel Disorders: Teaching Yourself to Live without the Problem

    112

    By: Mary K. Plummer, OTR, BCIA-PMBD; Jeanette Tries, PhD, OTR

    Biofeedback is a neuromuscular reeducation tool we can use to tell if certain processes in our bodies are working correctly. It is a painless process that uses a computer and a video monitor to display bodily functions that we usually are not aware of. Special sensors measure these functions, which are displayed as sounds we can hear, or as linegraphs we can see on a computer screen. A therapist helps us use this displayed information to modify or change abnormal responses to more normal patterns such as increasing a response, decreasing a response, or learning to coordinate two responses more effectively.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  3. Fact Sheet: Gynecological Aspects of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    123

    By: Margaret M. Heitkemper, RN, PhD; Monica Jarett

    Over a decade ago, investigators noted that approximately half of the women attending a gynecology clinic had symptoms (e.g., abdominal pain, change in bowel pattern) compatible with a diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Since that study, a number of other studies have demonstrated a higher prevalence of gynecologic disorders, such as pain associated with menstruation (dysmenorrhea) and premenstrual distress syndrome in women with IBS as compared to those without IBS.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  4. Fact Sheet: Visceral Sensations and Brain-Gut Mechanisms

    127

    By: Emeran A. Mayer, MD

    Over the past several years, different mechanisms located within the gut, or gut wall have been implicated as possible pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the characteristic IBS symptoms of abdominal pain and discomfort. The list ranges from altered transit of intestinal gas, alterations in the colonic flora, immune cell activation in the gut mucosa, and alterations in serotonin containing enterochromaffin cells lining the gut. For those investigators with a good memory, these novel mechanisms can be added to an older list of proposed pathomechanisms, including altered gut motility ("spastic colitis") and alterations in mucus secretion.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  5. Fact Sheet: Understanding and Managing Chronic Pain

    140

    By: Bruce D. Naliboff, PhD

    Most of the time pain serves as a critical part of our sensory system, and is therefore a necessary though unpleasant function of a healthy body. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that chronic pain may be more like a disease or pathology of the nervous system associated with abnormal responses in the brain and spinal cord. Chronic pain has an impact on every facet of patients' lives. If you have chronic pain it is important to develop a pain management plan that works for you.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  6. Fact Sheet: Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    141

    By: Douglas A. Drossman, MD

    People with functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders can have a variety of symptoms that range from painless diarrhea or constipation, to pain associated with diarrhea and/or constipation (usually called irritable bowel syndrome). There is another, less common condition of abdominal pain that is chronic or frequently recurring; it is not associated with changes in bowel pattern. This condition is called functional abdominal pain syndrome. Cause and treatment is discussed.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  7. Fact Sheet: The Lower GI Tract and its Common Functional Disorders:

    158

    By: David S. Greenbaum

    IBS, Chronic Functional Abdominal Pain, Bloating and Gas, Constipation, Diarrhea

    The term "functional" as used in medicine, generally is taken to mean symptoms not accompanied by demonstrable abnormalities on physical examination, blood tests, x-rays, biopsies, endoscopies or other procedures. An overview of common disorders that affect the colon.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  8. Fact Sheet: Rectocele: Symptoms Include Vaginal Pain or Constipation

    165

    By: Bruce A. Orkin, MD

    A rectocele is a bulge from the rectum into the vagina. Most rectoceles occur in women where the front wall of the rectum is up against the back wall of the vagina. This area is called the rectovaginal septum and may be a weak area in the female anatomy. Other structures may also push into the vagina. A description of causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  9. Fact Sheet: Bacteria and Foodborne Illness

    173

    By: Information Adapted from the National Diseases Information Clearinghouse NIH

    Foodborne illness results from eating food contaminated with bacteria (or their toxins) or other pathogens such as parasites or viruses. The illnesses range from upset stomach to more serious symptoms, including diarrhea, fever, vomiting, abdominal cramps, and dehydration. A discussion of causes, treatment, and prevention.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  10. Fact Sheet: Why Symptom Criteria for Functional Gut Disorders?

    182

    By: W. Grant Thompson, MD, FRCPC

    The "functional" gut disorders are syndromes (groups of symptoms) believed to arise from the gastrointestinal tract, but which lack a known cause. The purpose is to update the criteria upon which the diagnoses of functional gut disorders rest.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
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